Tiffany Windows

St. Luke’s is home to the fifth largest collection of Tiffany Windows in the United States. Every window in the church is a unique work of art.

Visiting Information

St. Luke’s welcomes visitors who want to experience the beauty of our windows.

General Windows Visitor Hours:
8:30-11:30 am & 1:00-4:00 pm, Monday through Friday (except Holidays), year round

Regular Guided Tours:
8:00 am to 11:00 am; Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; June through October

Scheduled Guided Tours:
To schedule a tour, groups must be 10 or more people, and may be scheduled for times that are Monday through Friday between 8am and 4pm. To schedule a tour call call (563) 582-4543.

Our Video Tour is available online and also at the church during general windows visitor hours. The video tour is 12 minutes long.

Donations: Many visitors offer a donation. Donations are gratefully accepted and used specifically for window restoration, repair, and preservation.

Historical Information

Information can be found on Wikipedia about Tiffany, Tiffany Glass and stained glass.

Donations are accepted and are used specifically for window restoration, repair, and preservation. Here is a link to the Bovard Studio who has restored these beautiful windows. They have some incredible photos and a video on how historic stained glass is restored.

Our Tiffany Windows were created by Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York. Mr. Tiffany created his own opalescent glass for his windows with varied colors infused throughout the glass. Through his unique process he was able to sculpt garment folds or water ripples in the glass itself. The faces portrayed in the windows glow with an intense luminosity above the surrounding scenes. The colors are like brilliant gems, changing shades with the angle of vision, the time of day, the weather, and the seasons.

Art Feminella, a Tiffany stained glass expert, described the windows of St. Luke’s in the following words:

“The Tiffany stained glass windows of the Church are the equal of the best found in an ecumenical setting. The studio’s full arsenal of artistic weapons has been unleashed and the resulting barrage of color, light, and line is quite a scene to behold. An extraordinary glass, rippled glass, drapery glass, etched flashed glass, and textured, rolled glass can be seen throughout the opalescent windows. The light floods through openings cut into the blocks of stone, transforming lumps of glass and strips of lead into brilliant jewels of light. The mood is restful, the effect quite spiritual.”

Individual pages for the windows are linked below the video.

Video Tour

The Angel Among the Lilies

        Originally called “the Maiden among the Lilies,” the window above the altar is a Resurrection picture given by the Richardson family in memory of their daughter, Harriet. The face is said to be the likeness of this beautiful young woman who died when she was only 18 years old. The inscription …

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David Set Singers Before The Lord

      The most brilliantly colored of all the windows portray David, King of Israel, clad in richly jeweled robes and crown of gold commanding two youthful bards to sing. The lion in the picture symbolizes David’s bravery as a shepherd boy and the harp shows he was a skilled musician. This window in …

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The Baptism of Christ

In the window depicting the Baptism of Christ, the figures of John the Baptist and Jesus are drawn with rare skill. The irises growing at the edge of the pool of rippling, opalescent water make a vivid artistic touch. This window, installed in 1916, was given by the family of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Chapman, …

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The Good Shepherd

 A masterpiece which has been described as the Twenty-Third Psalm in glass is a  memorial to D. N. Cooley  and his wife, Clara Aldrich Cooley.  This window was  exhibited at the Columbian Exposition in 1893 by the Tiffany Company as its finest  production in glass, and was purchased later for the church by Judge Cooley’s …

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The Ascension of Christ

 The largest window of the group on the north wall portrays Christ in robes of glistening  pearl surrounded by cherubic faces among the clouds. This work was given in memory  of Dr. George M. Staples, by Mrs. Abby Staples and family in 1896.

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The Angel of Victory

 This window was given by Mrs. Bertha Hancock and family in memory of Mr. John T.    Hancock in 1896.  The winged angel with uplifted hand holding a palm branch stands  against  a background of vividly contrasting colors of the early dawn.  The large vine laden  with purple  grapes is often used to symbolize the …

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Christ and the Children

 The figure of Christ holding a sleeping baby in one arm and with a hand laid in  blessing on a young boy is portrayed with gentle and tender beauty. Mrs. Jennie  Lewis Wales gave this window in honor of her parents, General Warner and  Caroline Lewis in 1916.

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The Good Samaritan

 One of the parables of Jesus is the subject in this window as told in Luke 10:25-  37. It was the first of a proposed series of five on the parables to be placed in the  sanctuary’s east wall. Both in its touching treatment of the subject and its  exquisite and restrained coloring, it is …

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The Job Window

 Above the balcony on the east wall is the largest window, 18 x  15 ft.,  depicting the unknown author of the Book of Job. The  figure holding a  pen and book stands against a landscape of  Palestine with the Dead  Sea in the background. It was given in  memory of Jesse P Farley  whose contributions …

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Misc. Tiffany Windows

 The bottom panels in the sliding doors were gifts from the Social  Union, the Epworth League and memorial panels were donated by the  L.O. Hillyard family, Mrs. Carrie A. Pollock, and Sarah J. Thomas. The  upper row of windows in the sliding doors contain symbols of the early  Church. At each end are the Alpha …

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